Author Archives

Tessa Gregory

Tessa is the Journal Media Manager at PLOS. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with degrees in Rhetoric and Music. She can be reached by email at tgregory@plos.org and on Twitter at @tessagregs.
Research Round-Up: Tardigrades’ genes help them survive extreme conditions; Women and children also exposed to hunting-related pathogens; Isotopes in Neolithic cattle teeth suggest a variety of herding strategies

Research Round-Up: Tardigrades’ genes help them survive extreme conditions; Women and children also exposed to hunting-related pathogens; Isotopes in Neolithic cattle teeth suggest a variety of herding strategies

Tardigrades’ genes help them survive extreme conditions Tardigrades are microscopic animals that can withstand complete dehydration, resurrecting years later when water is again available. To investigate the genes underlying their extraordinary ability to survive in extreme conditions, researchers analyzed the…
Read more
Research Round-Up: Fruit flies can grow resistant to CRISPR gene drives; Google searches can help track dengue outbreaks; Risk of hantavirus estimated to increase in Brazil

Research Round-Up: Fruit flies can grow resistant to CRISPR gene drives; Google searches can help track dengue outbreaks; Risk of hantavirus estimated to increase in Brazil

Fruit flies demonstrate increasing resistance to CRISPR gene drives Gene drives using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology aim to spread new genes within a natural population in efforts to prevent the spread of mosquito-borne diseases and control invasive species. However, this…
Read more
Research Round-Up: Researchers track Leishmania parasite in Brazil; Europe and China have a high burden of traumatic brain injuries; Bacterium promotes development of colorectal cancer

Research Round-Up: Researchers track Leishmania parasite in Brazil; Europe and China have a high burden of traumatic brain injuries; Bacterium promotes development of colorectal cancer

Dogs, wild animals and sand flies in protected area in Brazil carry Leishmania parasite Infected sand flies can transmit the Leishmania parasite through their bites, potentially leading to leishmaniasis, a parasitic infection that can be fatal to humans. This infection…
Read more